New Research: Childhood Obesity Increases Risk of Liver Cancer In Adulthood

Childhood obesity is a major problem affecting large number of children these days. The primary reason behind childhood obesity is unhealthy eating habits most children adopt at a very young age. In past few years childhood obesity has more than tripled. Obesity in childhood has several health effects, which can take a toll on health during adolescence. Some of the major risk factors associated with childhood obesity include cardiovascular disease, high cholesterol, high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes. Besides, childhood obesity also causes liver cancer.

A new study suggests that obese children are at a higher risk of developing liver cancer when they turn into adults [Source HealthDay News].  Research was conducted on more than 165,000 men and 160,000 women in Denmark.  The BMI and birth weight of men and women born between 1930 and 1989 was measured.  Nearly 252 of the participants were found to have hepatocellular carcinoma, a widespread form of liver cancer that develops in adulthood.

Researchers found that with increase in BMI there is a greater risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma at age 7. Those at age 7 had 12% chance of developing liver cancer, while those aged 13 years had 25% chance of developing the disease. Men and women of all ages experienced a similar condition.

Alcoholism, infection by hepatitis B and C and other liver diseases are some of the other factors related to liver cancer. The results from the study remained unchanged despite removal of participants with these factors. This is a clear indication that childhood obesity mainly contributed in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

 

 

Watch – Consequences Of Child Hood Obesity

 

Read More on Childhood Obesity:-

Weight Loss Tips For Teenage Girls

Teenage Obesity  

Share and Enjoy

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Delicious
  • Digg
  • StumbleUpon
  • Add to favorites
  • Email
  • RSS

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>